Jenner & Block LLP

CSBS Releases Recommendations for FinTech Regulators

By Camila A. Connolly

New-Update-IconOn February 12, the Conference of State Bank Supervisors (CSBS) released its Fintech Industry Advisory Panel Recommendations.  CSBS is a national organization of financial regulators from around the United States, Guam, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, and the US Virgin Islands.  The recommendations are designed to improve the use of regulatory technology and harmonize regulatory standards throughout the United States.  The recommendations include a plan to develop a model state law for MSBs and to standardize licensing requirements.  The panel also recommended a pilot program for building a uniform state licensing examination.  Overall, the recommendations seek to create uniformity in state FinTech licensing and regulation.  To aid in the harmonizing process, the panel recommends creating repositories of the different state laws and licensing requirements so that financial companies can access all necessary regulations at once.  CSBS includes these recommendations as part of a broader effort to streamline state FinTech regulation called Vision 2020.  Read the full list of recommendations here.


Proposed Federal Privacy Legislation and the Year Ahead

Data securityIn a recent Corporate Counsel article, Jenner & Block Partner Jeffrey A. Atteberry examines the current federal privacy legislative proposals and the impact potential data privacy and cybersecurity legislation could have on businesses.  Mr. Atteberry explains that several recent high-profile data breaches and questions about how social media platforms share consumers’ personal data are contributing to increasing demand for passage of federal data privacy legislation.  He explains that the bills and proposals that have circulated in the last year are the best indicator of what lies ahead in terms of any potential federal privacy regime.  To help corporate counsel anticipate changes that may arise, Mr. Atteberry breaks down the current congressional proposals and provides key takeaways for in-house counsel.

To read the full article, please click here.


Jenner & Block’s Food and Beverage Practice Once Again Named a “Practice Group of the Year” by Law360

PGotY-B-Linkedin-Single-1400x800For the third consecutive year, Jenner & Block’s Food and Beverage Practice is recognized as a Law360 Practice Group of the Year for successfully leading a diverse array of matters for the titans of the food and beverage industry.  Law360 notes that the firm fended off claims against our clients that include household names such as Hain Celestial, Kraft and Mondelēz and led Snyder’s-Lance in its $6 billion sale to Campbell Soup.  In addition, Partner Dean N. Panos highlights that the group is handling cases in many areas, including commercial litigation, supplier, distributor, joint venture disputes, M&A, insurance coverage, antitrust and investigations and enforcement.  He adds that the practice is not “totally a litigation practice: it is transactional, litigation, and…a counseling practice.”  He explains that because of the group’s experience and knowledge, “we understand, as best as an outside counsel can, the business pressures our clients face and how these businesses are run so that we are being a net positive to their work environments.”

To read Law360’s profile, please click here.


Businesses Express Concerns with CCPA at Public Forum

ConsumerIn an article published by the Daily Journal, Jenner & Block Partner Jeffrey A. Atteberry discusses the recent public forum that was hosted by the California attorney general’s office regarding the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA).  The forum was held in order to seek public comment on the CCPA as the attorney general moves forward with the initial phase of the rulemaking process.  Mr. Atteberry summarizes the concerns that businesses expressed at the forum, including a request to clarify the scope and meaning of the word “sell” as it relates to the sale of personal information, the need for guidance relating to the calculation of the revenue threshold in the CCPA, and the data security risks associated with the CCPA’s verification requirements, among others.

To read the full article, please click here.


En Banc Ninth Circuit Rejects Compelled Commercial Speech Ordinance on First Amendment Ground

By Gabriel K. Gillett

Beverage1Last week the en banc Ninth Circuit unanimously struck down San Francisco’s ordinance requiring warnings on ads for certain sugary beverages as a violation of the First Amendment.  In American Beverage Ass’n v. City and County of San Francisco, No. 16-16072, the court held that the Ordinance is an “unjustified or unduly burdensome disclosure requirement[] [that] might offend the First Amendment by chilling protected commercial speech.”  Zauderer v. Office of Disciplinary Counsel, 471 U.S. 626, 651 (1985).  (Jenner & Block filed an amicus brief in the case, on behalf of the Retail Litigation Center.) 

Four of the eleven judges who participated joined three special concurrences, however, explaining why they believed the majority had erred even though it reached the right result.  Those three concurrences highlight a number of issues related to commercial speech for courts to address in the wake of the Supreme Court’s decision in National Institute of Family & Life Advocates v. Becerra (NIFLA), 138 S. Ct. 2361 (2018).   
 

San Francisco’s “Sugar-Sweetened Beverage” Ordinance

The American Beverage Association v. City and County of San Francisco centers on a 2015 ordinance that required ads for certain “Sugar-Sweetened Beverages” to include the following:  “WARNING: Drinking beverages with added sugar(s) contributes to obesity, diabetes, and tooth decay. This is a message from the City and County of San Francisco.”  Slip op. 8.

Continue reading "En Banc Ninth Circuit Rejects Compelled Commercial Speech Ordinance on First Amendment Ground " »


Top 10 of 2018: The Best Consumer Law Round-Up Posts of the Year

2018 was another busy year for the Consumer Law Round-Up. Launched by the firm’s Consumer Law Practice, the blog updates readers on key developments within consumer law and provides insights that are relevant to companies and individuals that may be affected by the ever-increasing patchwork of federal and state consumer protection statutes. In 2018, the Consumer Law Round-Up featured posts by approximately 20 different authors on a wide array of topics. 

Below is a list of the Top 10 most popular posts of 2018. 


#1 SDNY Rules CFPB Unconstitutional, Creating Split of Authority and Raising New Questions

Since its inception, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has faced controversy over its structure as an independent agency headed by a single director who can be removed by the President only for cause. Critics have invoked the unitary executive theory to argue that the Constitution permits an agency to enjoy independence from at-will termination by the President only if the agency is headed by multiple commissioners, directors, or board members...Read more

#2 SEC Take on Tokens Clarifies Some Crypto Community Quandaries

In a June 14 speech, William Hinman, the SEC’s Director of the Division of Corporate Finance, began to place additional definition around the raging debate over whether digital assets, including tokens, are securities. Until that speech, much commentary had focused on the repeat statements by SEC officials that digital assets distributed in initial coin offerings (ICOs) are almost always securities in the SEC’s view, with the possible exception of widely disseminated cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin...Read more

#3 The Supreme Court Reaffirms the Reach and Force of the Federal Arbitration Act, This Time in Employment Cases

On May 21, 2018, the Supreme Court issued its long-awaited decision in the consolidated cases Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis, No. 16-285; Ernst & Young LLP v. Morris, No. 16-300; and NLRB v. Murphy Oil USA, No. 16-307. In a 5-4 opinion by Justice Gorsuch, the Court held that courts must enforce arbitration agreements requiring employees to bring employment-related claims in individualized arbitration proceedings, and barring them from pursuing those claims...Read more

Continue reading "Top 10 of 2018: The Best Consumer Law Round-Up Posts of the Year" »


Crypto Winter Continues With Ongoing Enforcement

   

By Michael W. Ross, Andrew J. Lichtman and Emily A. Bruemmer

Crypto-winterSeveral recent “first of kind” enforcement proceedings continue the flurry of enforcement activity by regulators.  In two settled proceedings, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) brought two cases for failure to register digital tokens as securities in connection with initial coin offerings (ICOs), without allegations of fraud.  With such enforcement actions now commonplace, a “crypto winter” has clearly set in.  In another development, a federal court recently issued the first opinion concluding that the SEC had failed to establish that a digital asset issued in connection with an ICO was a “security” under the federal securities laws, underscoring that digital assets will not be subject to a one-size-fits-all analysis.

As for the two settled charges, according to the SEC’s orders, Paragon Coin, Inc.[1] and AirFox[2] launched their ICOs in 2017.  Paragon is an online company that was established to implement blockchain technology in the cannabis industry, as well as to work towards legalization of cannabis.  Through its ICO, Paragon raised approximately $12 million in digital assets to develop and expand its business.  As for AirFox, it sells mobile technology intended to allow customers to earn free or discounted data by watching advertisements on their phones.  AirFox raised approximately $15 million in its ICO to help expand its business overseas.  Neither Paragon nor AirFox registered their ICOs.

Continue reading "Crypto Winter Continues With Ongoing Enforcement" »


Blockchain, Antitrust and Standard Setting

BlockchainIn an article for Fintech Weekly, Partner Michael W. Ross explains that, as companies have experimented with blockchain and other distributed ledger technologies, commentators have highlighted antitrust concerns.  Mr. Ross suggests areas to watch as the technology expands, particularly at the International Standards Organization and the Federal Trade Commission.  The article also notes the possibility for developing blockchain standards that may foster efficiency, compatibility and interoperability of diverse technologies through the adoption of “FRAND licensing” concepts.

To read the full article, please click here.


Recent Activity Brings Further Clarity to Cryptocurrency Enforcement

 

By Michael W. Ross and Andrew J. Lichtman

image from https://s3.amazonaws.com/feather-client-files-aviary-prod-us-east-1/2018-09-26/d04d50c7-b740-45a9-b4a6-3b9e95def44d.pngSeptember saw a flurry of activity that will help further define the cryptocurrency regulatory landscape.  The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”) brought its first-ever crypto-fraud case and a court ruling by the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York gave backing to the view that digital assets will be viewed as securities.  And, in two enforcements actions, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) branched out beyond actions against fraudulent crypto-schemes and went after crypto companies for failing to register with the SEC.  The latter two cases signal that the SEC is committed to enforcing applicable securities law requirements beyond those accused of fraud, and therefore SEC enforcement activity remains an area for legitimate businesses to watch.

A Federal Court Rules On Whether Digital Assets Are Securities

Last October, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Brooklyn brought charges against Maksim Zaslavskiy alleging that Zaslavskiy made false representations in connection with two cryptocurrencies and their related initial coin offerings (“ICOs”) in violation of U.S. securities law.  According to the indictment, Zaslavskiy induced investors to purchase tokens in an ICO for “REcoin” by falsely claiming that REcoin was backed by real estate investments.  Similarly, the government alleged, Zaslavskiy falsely claimed that a second cryptocurrency, “Diamond,” was backed by actual diamonds when it was not.

Continue reading "Recent Activity Brings Further Clarity to Cryptocurrency Enforcement" »


How Blockchain Use Can Block Competition

BlockchainIn an article for Law360, Partners Daniel T. Fenske and Justin C. Steffen examine anti-competition issues with blockchain.  The authors explain that anti-competition issues abound now that financial institutions, corporations and other industries are investing in blockchain technology.  The issues, they observe, can be mitigated through early planning.  The authors discuss the “basics” of blockchain and anti-competition risks.  “The antitrust risks of blockchain technology will be clarified as the technology develops and it is put to more uses,” they conclude.  “It is critical that you consult competent antitrust counsel when structuring blockchain technology and policies so as to best mitigate antitrust risk.”

To read the full article, please click here.